Thank you to Z Energy Good in the Hood

Thank you to Z Energy Good in the Hood

We we thrilled to receive a donation of $838.59 from Z Energy Good in the Hood. Huge thanks to everyone in our community who voted for us at Z Vivian Street and congratulations to all the charities and initiatives that received funds, including our friends at Wellington Rape Crisis! We had a great time hanging out with lots of awesome community organisations the morning tea...

Good in the Hood: Vote for SAPN!

Vote for us to receive a share of $4,000 from Z Vivian Street! Sexual Abuse Prevention Network is one of the four groups being supported through Good in the Hood at Z Vivian Street. That means we’ll get a share of $4,000—but how much depends on how many votes we get. To vote for us, all you need to do is buy something from Z Vivian Street during May and you’ll be given an orange token to put in the voting box (or if you’re a Z card holder, you’ll get two votes!). So please head down to Z Vivian Street during May and vote for us! You can also support us by encouraging people you know to vote too by posting on Facebook or...

Job Opportunities with SAPN

The application process for these jobs is now closed. Demand for SAPN’s programmes is growing and we’re excited to be recruiting for three positions: Programme Co-ordinator, Educator (fixed term), Educator (casual contract) Check out our Job Vacancies page for more information....

Specialist sexual violence service supports calls from youth for consent education in schools

Specialist sexual violence prevention organisation, Sexual Abuse Prevention Network supports the calls from secondary school students for compulsory consent education in schools. Widely publicized incidents in Wellington schools over the last week have prompted calls from secondary school students for compulsory consent education. Wellington secondary school students led a march to parliament last week to demand the education and a petition has been launched on online campaign platform, Action Station. “We’ve heard what the young people are saying and we absolutely support their demand. It is essential that we teach young people about consent and healthy relationships. Who knows better what young people need than young people themselves?” says Sexual Abuse Prevention Network General Manager, Fiona McNamara. Sexual Abuse Prevention Network specialises in providing education to young people that teaches young people to recognise the signs of abusive relationships and promotes healthy relationships and consent. SAPN delivers several well developed courses in the Wellington region, including their “Who are You?” programme and ACC’s “Mates and Dates” programme. However, the organisation says that its capacity to be delivering in all schools is currently stretched due to insecure resourcing, and that other specialist providers throughout the country are in the same position. “The government needs to make consent education a priority and fund the delivery of effective specialist programmes accordingly” says McNamara. All young people would benefit from access to education about healthy relationships. “We need programmes to be in every year level in every school. It is important that students receive this education each year at school. We are talking about cultural overhaul – this is not a quick fix...
Recent incidents at Wellington College and St Patrick’s Silverstream

Recent incidents at Wellington College and St Patrick’s Silverstream

SAPN was disappointed to hear about the conversations within a private Facebook group of senior Wellington College students. It is never okay to engage in sexual activity with an intoxicated person, and any such contact is illegal. Moreover, the idea of “taking advantage” of someone defies the definition of consent. Likewise, it is disturbing to read reports of younger students at St. Patrick’s College Silverstream making intimate visual recordings of female staff members. It’s clear that young men in New Zealand are being exposed to extremely problematic attitudes towards women, and that these attitudes are translating into harmful actions. SAPN hopes that we can broaden the conversation and use these events to encourage change – both within these schools, and in wider society. There has been a strong focus on the individuals who made the various comments – but it is important to recognize the culture around these individuals that allows them to think that their behaviour is acceptable. Whether it’s the students who ‘liked’ the posts, or the many who saw the comments and said nothing – we need to recognize that these are not one-off, isolated incidents. Likewise, the question about whether these attitudes have transferred into actions supports the myth that it only ‘counts’ as sexual violence when a physical interaction has occurred. A culture that allows young men to communicate in this way, without any intervention, provides a pathway to extreme physical sexual violence. Excuses like “boys will be boys” only create space for these harmful attitudes to thrive. Teenage boys laughing about sexual relations with intoxicated young women on Facebook is all too familiar...